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>> pelley: tonight, the u.s. takes aim at iran over the alleged assassination plot. >> iran must be held accountable for its actions. >> pelley: norah o'donnell on what actions the u.s. might take. attention, holiday air travelers-- expect fewer seats and higher prices. ben tracy on operation hackerazzi, the f.b.i. arrests a man accused of hacking into the personnel e-mail accounts of hollywood celebrities. and dewey bozella wouldn't let a terrible injustice defeat him. now he's fighting for his dream. >> don't let nobody tell you what you can do, and that's what i'm doing. i'm letting my dream come to reality. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. president obama slapped new sanctions on iran today, and the white house said there could be more to come. all of that in response to that alleged plot to assassination saudi arabia's ambassador to the united states. the administration is consulting with allies all around the world. u.s. officials insist that the iranian government was behind the plot. norah o'donnell is
into debt. dean reynolds tells us why some believe it will only get worse. and in a state with high unemployment, ben tracy on why there are thousands of jobs with no workers to fill them. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. from the emerald city. at a time when there is so much anger in the streets of america over wall street greed and corporate corruption, we begin tonight with one of the biggest wall street insider trading cases ever. at a time when many americans were losing their 401(k)s, prosecutors say rajat gupta was leaking secret corporate information to a hedge fund tycoon so that that tycoon's fund wouldn't suffer the same fate. gupta was in a perfect position to do that inside the board rooms of some of the country's biggest corporations. the result, prosecutors say, was that the hedge fund made millions while ordinary americans got soaked. justice correspondent bob orr has our story. >> reporter: as a board more february proctor & gamble, and goldman sachs, rajat gupta regularly heard sensitive corporat
restored. but as john blackstone tells us, the crash of 2011 might be a wakeup call. >> reporter: the hardware failure and the two-day backlog in e-mails that disabled blackberry service from the middle east to north america was a warning to a world that's become ever more dependent on always being connected. this man works on wall street. >> you realize how much you do rely on these mechanisms and just kind of pulling my hair out. >> reporter: 35% of american adults use smart phones like the blackberry or iphone. two-thirds even say they've slept with them. but while the old-fashioned land line phone system was built to virtually always work, hand-held devices have never been that dependable says tech analyst charles govin. >> we all live with sporadic outages. i won't say on a daily basis but it's not infrequent. >> reporter: that's a reason govin has cell phones from three different carriers to make sure he's never entirely disconnected. >> today we still use the phrase "to go online" but the truth is we don't go online, we are online. we live our lives online. the net has bec
the subjects got stronger after going diving. kind of completely blew us out of the water. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. if you were looking for the day the economy began to rise, today could be a contender. the government told us that growth accelerated in the third quarter-- and have a look at the trend. growth in the first quarter was 0.4%. in the second quarter, 1.3%. and today's number 2.5%. that's still weak, but there is a hint of momentum. earlier today, the europeans worked out a plan to contain their debt crisis and that sent markets surging. for october, the dow is up more than 11%-- on track for its largest one-month percentage gain in 25 years which brings us to our favorite picture of the day: a man on a german trading floor. too much optimism in that face? maybe. 14 million americans are still out of work. so we turn for perspective to anthony mason at the new york stock exchange. anthony? >> reporter: that huge rally this month, scott, has pushed stocks into positive territory for the year. the 2.5% growth
around the world. u.s. officials insist that the iranian government was behind the plot. norah o'donnell is at the white house with the latest. norah. >> reporter: scott, tonight, secretary of state hillary clinton said iran must be held accountable for what she called a reckless act that the u.s. will not tolerate. >> this plot was a flagrant violation of international and u.s. law and a dangerous escalation of the iranian government's long-standing use of political violence and sponsorship of terrorism. >> reporter: secretary clinton said the plot was directed by elements of the iranian government, including the deadly quds force, an elite secret branch of the iranian military. it was a brazen murder-for-hire plot right out of a spy novel where an iranian-born u.s. citizen wanted to hire a mexican drug cartel to kill the saudi ambassador. the details are so bizarre, some u.s. officials said it looked like the work of amateurs. >> i would be careful about calling this a sloppy operation or amateurish or cowboyish. >> reporter: michigan republican mike rogers chairs the house int
that kind of growth. >> reporter: and he's used his voice around the world to encourage job creation, but prosecutor says gupta, who appeared in court today,om openly flaunted security laws. inaise statement, his lawyer called the charges baseless, saying mr. gupta is innocent. he has always acted with honesty and integrity. tonight, gupta is free on it will $10 million bail after pleading not guilty. he's not accused of directly profiting from the inside information he allegedly passed on, but if convicted he faces 105 years in prison and millions in fines. >> pelley: thanks, bob. hedge fund manager raj rajaratnam was sentenced earlier this month to 11 years in prison, the longest term ever for an insider trading case. the biggest name in wall street fraud is bernie madoff, whose ponzi scheme robbed investors of $20 billion. madoff is in prison, and his family has been in seclusion until tonight. in a story for "60 minutes," morley safer sat down with madoff's wife, ruth, and his son, andrew. in the interview, andrew madoff recalls a time he received an envelope with surprising cont
. wyatt andrews tells us how much of a raise they'll be getting. wyatt? >> reporter: scott, this is an average but the social security raise we expect to be announced for next january will be around $38 a month. for the tens of millions of retirees who have had no cost of living raise for the last three years, it's real money and it's about time is when seniors heard the news in miami, this was the response. jose perez says the increase will help him pay his utility bill. >> with the increase in social security i will be able to have heat and cold whenever i need it. >> reporter: social security is expected to announce a cola-- a cost of living adjustment-- of around 3.5%. it's the first increase since 2009. seniors receiving the average benefit of $1,082 a month would receive an extra $37.84. for retirees dependent on social security, $38 a month can be a lifesaver. david asher counsels retirees at the center for jewish family services in los angeles. >> well, it can be a difference between food and rent. or between going to the doctor or cutting back on their prescription
at 6:00. >> we'll see you then. thanks for watching us. scott pelly is coming up next. >> the latest news and weather is always on cbssf.com. after the crash that killed racing superstar dan wheldon, fans and other drivers are asking were there too many cars on the track? norah o'donnell is with the president on his "it's not a campaign tour" campaign tour. we asked the secretary of defense why u.s. troops are being sent into another war zone. did you have reason to believe that this part of central africa was becoming a haven for terrorism? and john blackstone on how the creator of the iphone and ipad inspired a generation of americans to say "i can." >> stay hungry, stay foolish. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, drivers in the las vegas 300 are telling us tonight it was an accident waiting to happen and, of course it did. taking the life of one of the superstars of this sport-- 33- year-old dan wheldon. now many are asking questions about how it happened and whether it could have been averted. toda
>> pelley: tonight, the u.s. accuses iran of plotting an assassination in the united states. the alleged target, the saudi ambassador. a u.s. citizen is under arrest. bob orr, liz palmer, and norah o'donnell are on the story. jan crawford on a big boost for mitt romney. an endorsement from chris christie. dr. jon lapook tells us about a new study that links vitamin "e" to an increased risk of prostate cancer. and celia hatton on the search for the american dream in, of all places, china. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. tonight, the united states is accusing the iranian government of plotting to assassinate the saudi ambassador to the u.s. with a bombing attack on a restaurant here in america. one man who holds u.s. and iranian citizenship is under arrest, another suspect is at large. the justice department says the man in custody has confessed and identified iranian government officials who were involved. secretary of state hillary clinton says this "crosses a line an iran needs to be held accountable." i
were never found. then the u.s. found it in the middle of a civil war, caught between two branches of islam. on this historic day, we have reports from david martin and norah o'donnell. first david who's at fort brag, north carolina. >> reporter: good evening, scott. fort bragg is the home of the 82nd airborne which currently has 3,500 troops in iraq. they'll all be home for the holidays because today the president pulled the plug on negotiations that could have kept some american troops in iraq past the end of the year. >> the rest of our troops in iraq will come home by the end of the year. after nearly nine years, america's war in iraq will be over. >> reporter: for better or worse, the military operation which began with shock and awe in march of 2003 and descended into the mayhem of civil war is really going to end. even though both americans an iraqis agree there are still holes in iraqi defenses. the u.s. had offered to keep up to 5,000 troop there is to train iraqis in air defense, intelligence, and protecting against the threat of invasion, particularly from iran. but scar
to congress are way down. america's baby doctors say no t.v. for children under two. dr. jon lapook tells us why. and bob orr goes along with police on the trail of smugglers trafficking in something more profitable than drugs. >> this is becoming the new organized crime, the new prohibition. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the official word from the government won't come until tomorrow but we can tell you tonight that if you are one of the 55 million americans on social security you will be getting a raise in january. the first in three years. that's welcome news for retirees who the government says mostly rely on social security for a majority of their income and the raise comes at a time when seniors have seen prices go up while retirement nest eggs have shrunk and the value of homes has fallen. wyatt andrews tells us how much of a raise they'll be getting. wyatt? >> reporter: scott, this is an average but the social security raise we expect to be announced for next january will be around $38 a month. for the tens of m
on the environment around us. >> reporter: they haveave food court, medical unit, and public a daily newspaper called "the occupied "wall street journal"." >> where are the jobs they have created? all they create is money for themselves. >> reporter: 69-year-old patricia walsh came from denver. she protested the democratic convention back in 1968. >> these kids are right on target about how our country has to change, and they have good heart. >> reporter: scott, by the look of it, it doesn't appear to be ending any time soon. and protesters say they will remain here at this small park through winter. >> pelley: thanks, michelle. the protests are spreading. there were demonstrations in more than a dozen cities, including boston, baltimore, chicago, denver, los angeles, san francisco, and seattle. in some places, there were only a few protesters, but in others, there were several thousands. in new york city, the police are trying to make sure the protests don't get out of hand as they have from time to time here in the europe. the n.y.p.d. is using a controversial crowd control technique and we'll aske
'donnell is with the president on his "it's not a campaign tour" campaign tour. we asked the secretary of defense why u.s. troops are being sent into another war zone. did you have reason to believe that this part of central africa was becoming a haven for terrorism? and john blackstone on how the creator of the iphone and ipad inspired a generation of americans to say "i can." >> stay hungry, stay foolish. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, drivers in the las vegas 300 are telling us tonight it was an accident waiting to happen and, of course it did. taking the life of one of the superstars of this sport-- 33-year-old dan wheldon. now many are asking questions about how it happened and whether it could have been averted. today at the indianapolis motor speedway where wheldon twice drove to victory in the indy 500 fans paid their respects. he leaves behind a wife and two small children. wheldon's father spoke to reporters earlier today. >> daniel was born to be a racer and left us doing what he loved to do. >> pelley: we asked bill whit dore loo
from a u.s. drone aircraft. we have reports tonight from david martin and bob orr. first to david at the pentagon. david? >> reporter: bob, the hunt for al-awlaki was code named "objective troy" and has been in high gear for months. a c.i.a. drone finally got him, but that was just the tip of a much larger operation. missiles fired by the drone took out al-awlaki's vehicle, making the american-born cleric the first u.s. citizen to be targeted and killed as a terrorist. a senior defense official said "a very bad man just had a very bad day." the president seemed to have no qualms about al-awlaki's american roots. >> al-awlaki was the leader of external operations for al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. in that role, he took the lead in planning and directing efforts to murder innocent americans. >> reporter: samir khan, another american member of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, and two passengers were also killed. but al-awlaki was the main target. he had narrowly escaped an earlier drone strike the week after the bin laden raid and this time the u.s. was take no chances. his hid
>> pelley: good evening, drivers in the las vegas 300 are telling us tonight it was an accident waiting to happen and, of course it did. taking the life of one of the superstars of this sport-- 33-year-old dan wheldon. now many are asking questions about how it happened and whether it could have been averted. today at the indianapolis motor speedway where wheldon twice drove to victory in the indy 500 fans paid their respects. he leaves behind a wife and two small children. wheldon's father spoke to reporters earlier today. >> daniel was born to be a racer and left us doing what he loved to do. >> pelley: we asked bill whit dore look into the crash and tonight he is at the las vegas motor speedway. bill? >> reporter: scott, in the days before yesterday's race, some drivers had expressed concerns about the track speed here at the las vegas motor speedway and especially the high banks that allow drivers to maintain speeds above 200 miles per hour. >> looking for dan wheldon... >> reporter: just 11 laps into the race with cars packed four deep at speeds approaching 225 miles per ho
o'donnell reports the u.s. ambassador to syria has been called home after threats were made on his life. most hispanic voters went for president obama last time, but bill whitaker found some are saying not this time. >> no, he does not have my vote. >> pelley: and john blackstone in los angeles, where folks wait all night for the only medical care they can afford. captioning sponsored by cbs >> this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from los angeles. >> pelley: good evening. president obama attacked congress today with some of the harshest language yet. then he did an end run around the house and the senate. he offered relief to some homeowners struggling to pay their mortgages, and he did it with an executive order that does not need the approval of congress. the president is beginning a western campaign tour, which includes a stop here in los angeles tonight. but he made the mortgage relief announcement today in nevada and for one very good reason. bill plante is traveling with the president. bill? >> reporter: well, scott, nevada has the highest forec
to bring troops home. but the top u.s. commander tells us american forces will be in afghanistan for the foreseeable future. >> afghanistan is not going to be abandoned. >> pelley: we'll take you along with the 10th mountain division on their drive to oust the taliban. >> this piece of ground that you're building on now cost you what? >> 32 american soldiers. >> pelley: and she's free. an italian court overturns the murder conviction of american amanda knox. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. from forward operating base pasab. ten years ago this week, the u.s. went to war in afghanistan to root out the terrorists who attacked america and to top it will taliban government that gave them safe haven. that has been done. but the taliban-- using pakistan as a base-- fights on. in a cbs news poll out tonight, we asked americans if the war has been mostly a success. 39% said yes, but 50% said no. we asked whether u.s. forces should be decreased and 62% said yes. there are about 90,000 u.s. troops here, and president oba
the begin. >> the cold weather will in some ways help us find out who's actually serious about this movement. >> reporter: ellis roberts has been here for a month. >> sleeping bags are illegal in the park. so if they enforce that, we're going to cut arm holes in them and call them jackets. >> reporter: the cold is one of a growing list of problems for the occupy movement. dozens were arrested as protester camps were cleared in nashville and san diego. both cities cited rising police overtime costs and concerns about sanitation and safety. protesters in new york took cell phone video as the fire department confiscated their six generators, pulling the plug on lights, hot plates, cell phone chargers, and laptops. but stacey tsortzatzos hopes the inconveniences keep coming. >> just when things started getting better we had the situation with the occupy wall street happen which actually killed our business. >> reporter: her sandwich shop is across the street from the occupy wall street camp. how much of your business has dropped off? >> i have to say 40%. >> reporter: 40%? >> yes. >> reporter: n
was traveling with the ambulance drivers and told us about the scene. >> i couldn't see his face at first. he was bare-chested. there was some blood on his pants, but i could tell that he looked dead and then i saw the top of his head. there was blood and his hair which is like the signature of qaddafi, the frizzy air. they were very excited and, of course, you know, giving me the universal victory sign. they also at one point pulled out a boot that they said was colonel qaddafi's and were, you know, sort of holding it out the window. yeah, they were just ecstatic. >> pelley: there is jubilation in the libyan capital of tripoli tonight. reporter kitty logan is there now and, kitty, what have you been seeing? >> reporter: scenes of euphoria in the city today. it started when the first rumors came out that colonel qaddafi might have been captured, with the honking of horns, gunfire-- celebratory gunfire-- people shooting into the air. and when that news was confirmed, the city erupted. people here absolutely rapturous on the... hearing the news that colonel qaddafi was actually killed when the
: the paraplegic was 32-year-old jimmy brown, paralyzed from the waist down. >> behind us there was almost a fight. in front of us people are yelling. "just bring the stairs, let us get off the plane." yelling at the pilot and airline attendants. >> reporter: under a new passengers' bill of rights, an airline can be fined the $27,500 per passenger for delays of more than three hours but fliersrights.org says the airport is also to blame. >> they should have been able to handle it. they're an international airport. all of their excuses are because they sent employees and customs home early. >> reporter: the last man off flight 504 agrees. >> i don't see why they couldn't use the stairs at 4:00, 5:00, 6:00. why did it take until 11:00 for me to get off the plane? >> reporter: in a statement, hartford's bradley international said its resources were stretched to the limit by the 23 diverted flights. jetblue blamed a confluence of events and said all passengers would receive full refunds. >> pelley: anthony, let me ask you the question we've been asking in the newsroom all day. why didn't they just rol
crazy. it started to take off. it headed away from us to the wooded area. and our officers put it down. >> reporter: joel harris shot this cell phone video of a bear. >> a wolf comes from the fence that the bear is in, and comes up to the fence and then just pops rete through the fence. >> reporter: thompson was well known to local law enforcement here. he had just gotten out of prison after serving a year on federal firearms violations and had been visited numerous times following complaints about his menagerie. >> we've handled numerous complaints here. we've been to mr. thompson's house for some sort of problems with the animals, from animals running at large to not being treated properly. so this has been a huge problem for us for a lot of years. >> reporter: terry thompson's widow asked police to help her bury all the animals in a mass grave on their property. included in the cair carnage, s, endangered species. bengal tier, only 2400 left in the world, 18 of them died here. >> pelley: cynthia, thank you. 49 animals killed in all today, and we just found out the firearms charge th
leave millions of homeowners under water. as one administration official put it to us, "it's hard to debate that we need to do much more." scott? >> pelley: bill, thank you. as bill mentioned, the power of the president's executive order reaches only fraction of the people in need, and that leaves about ten million americans asking, what about me? we asked wyatt andrews to answer that question. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of struggling homeowners might be helped by the president's mortgage plan, but ken lalonde is not one of them. he qualifies in almost every way, including the most important. >> never missed a payment. >> never missed a payment, never been late with payment. >> reporter: but here's the hold-up. ken's loan is held by the bank of new york and not by fannie mae or freddie mac. at a time when lower interest rates could save him $2,500 a year, he says the bank has blocked his request to refinance. >> basically they've said, we don't have program for you. i don't apparently fit into this program either. and that's my dilemma thus far is i keep running into a roa
? >> reporter: scott, u.s. officials say it was an audacious murder for hire plot conceived, financed, and put into motion by officials inside the iranian government. the intended target was the saudi ambassador to the united states, abdel al-jubeir. >> there was the threat of violence and terrorism. >> reporter: a close krft of the saudi king and u.s. officials. attorney general eric holder unveiled the plot saying it was launched in iran last spring by officials inside a special operations unit of the iranian military. >> this was directed and approved by elements of the iranian government and specifically senior members of the quds force. >> reporter: court papers unsealed today allege quds officials conspired with an iranian american named manssor arbabsiar to plot the killing. arbabsiar traveled to mexico to hire a hit squad he believed worked for one of the violent mexican drug cartel. instead, arbabsiar made contact with an undercover informant working for the d.e.a. over six months, the informant recorded conversations with arbabsiar and helped him solicit $100,000 from iranian contact
>> pelley: good evening. from forward operating base pasab. ten years ago this week, the u.s. went to war in afghanistan to root out the terrorists who attacked america and to top it will taliban government that gave them safe haven. that has been done. but the taliban-- using pakistan as a base-- fights on. in a cbs news poll out tonight, we asked americans if the war has been mostly a success. 39% said yes, but 50% said no. we asked whether u.s. forces should be decreased and 62% said yes. there are about 90,000 u.s. troops here, and president obama intends to withdraw about a third of them by next summer. those troops have their hands full. this was a scene that we shot in kandahar province where americans were entering new taliban territory for the first time. u.s. casualties reached an all-time high over the summer. a nato conference in lisbon set 2014 as the date the u.s. will hand security back over to afghanistan. but tonight we're hearing that may not be the end of it. in an interview for "60 minutes", we sat down with the new commanding general for afghanistan, marine cor
of 56. edison invented the phonograph, jobs gave us a thousand songs in our pockets with the ipod. edison invented the motion picture camera. jobs revel electrocutionized movie making. edison gave us electric lights. jobs' computer iphones and ipads lit up our lives. john blackstone begins our coverage of steve jobs and his legacy. >> reporter: scott, here at apple's headquarters in cupertino, the flags are at half-staff, people are stopping to leave tributes. this place, silicon valley, was not just steve jobs' home, this is a place he helped to create and a police that helped to create him. steve jobs grew up here, the adopted son of parents of modest means. in true silicon valley style, he started apple computer in the family garage with his buddy steve wozniak. how young and naive we were in thinking out our original ideas. >> reporter: wozniak was the engineer, jobs was the one with the ideas, pushing to make a computer that would be easy, even fun to use. in 1981, long before most people even touched a computer, jobs somehow knew what it would take to make computers catch on
. and ten years ago tonight, he led the u.s. into afghanistan after getting one clear order. >> i want you to cut bin laden's head off, put it on dry ice, and send it back to me so i can show the president. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, in this economy it has become a ritual. the first friday of every month waiting for the latest unemployment numbers to see if they've gotten better or worse. today we learned that unemployment in september was 9.1%, unchanged, stuck in the 9s now for 27 of the past 29 months. in september, the economy did gain 103,000 jobs, but that's a drop in the bucket when you consider the net job loss since the recession began is 6,649,000. bussiness correspondent anthony mason is here with insight into why businesses aren't hiring. anthony? >> reporter: these were better- than-expected numbers, scott, but not good enough. why are businesses holding back? we asked the c.e.o. of a top american company. in your view, where's the economy right now? >> while things aren't booming, things are okay. >>
momentum. an almost ceaseless attack using rockets, mortars and heavy machine guns has moved the front lines forward more in the last two days than even the attackers expected but with nowhere to run and no reason to expect mercy, the hard core of what's left of qaddafi's forces aren't giving up ground easily. reinforcements of former rebels and their "mad max" vehicles charged through gap in their protective role to head to the front lines stirred on by a sense of victory and a cry that is both call to arms and prayer. prayers they feel are answered when comrades in arms meet joyful each has survived to fight on. abdurraouf abdurraouf sadi, an oil field engineer turned fighter says he had no choice but to be here. >> reporter: for the time, the prize of surt is finally won there's not likely to be much left there but the value of surt is not material it's psychological, its fall will mean the actual end of qaddafi. not everyone in qaddafi's birthplace was loyal to him, but the fighters who now control the rebels are jumpy, fearful snipers may be hiding here. the assault on the last ba
and dramatic effects in alabama, so we asked mark strassmann to show us what it all means. >> reporter: liz betancourt is scared to leave the house in florence, alabama. >> i'm illegal. i'm not from here. >> reporter: her family moved from mexico to the u.s. when liz was an infant. she's now 19 but has never applied for citizenship or a green card. under the state's new law, if she's picked up by police, she could be deported and during that process-- which can take months-- there's no legal guaranty her daughter born in alabama and a u.s. citizen would stay with her. but the widespread perception among illegal immigrants is deportation would split families apart, although any deported parents would be allowed to take their children with them. >> we just came here to work. our parents, those that have children, they just come here to give their children a good education. >> reporter: even a routine trip to the store has many illegal immigrants here worried they'll end up getting arrested and in case they're deported, some parents are signing papers turning over the legal care of their kids
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)